July 25, 1965: With a simple “Let’s Go!” Bob Dylan breaks into a rocking version  of “Maggie’s Farm” at the Newport Folk Festival.   Some were horrified as young music fans searching for authenticity usually are, and it was seen as a betrayal of the purity of the folk movement.  Dylan chose to wear a leather jacket and play electric guitar backed by members of “The Paul Butterfield Blues Band” including Mike Bloomfield, who is seen here playing these amazing solos and fills.   Dylan was booed off the stage after a few songs and returned to play an acoustic set later on.  His determination to “go electric” brought him a legion of new fans and even some of the folkies forgave him.  In many respects it represented an artist frustrated with the limits of his persona willing to try new things and keeping ahead of his conservative audience.  

benoitp:

WHERE I SLEEP

Lois Smith and James Dean’s screen test for “East of Eden”, 1954

Matinée au cap Tourmente - Les Faisans dans la volière,  Jean-Paul Riopelle

Late in his career, Jean-Paul Riopelle became a more representational painter, but also continued to express his love of nature.

Between 1967 and 1970, Dustin Hoffman starred in “The Graduate”, “Midnight Cowboy”, and “Little Big Man”, three iconic films that established him as a Hollywood anti-hero and which revealed a range of acting ability that stumped the critics, many of whom felt he was too unattractive to be a leading man.  These films also tackled subjects that were usually glossed over by mainstream studios (adultery, homosexuality, homelessness, and a positive portrayal of Native Americans).   If  directors Mike Nichols, John Schlesinger, and Arthur Penn were some of the artists responsible for changing the direction of Hollywood films, Hoffman was their muse.  He also paved the way for the emergence of a new leading man in the 1970’s (Robert De Niro and Al Pacino are two examples).  If you thought he was funny in the “Folkers” comedies, watch these three just to understand his significance as a performer.

bateaurouge:

Claude Jutra - The Devil’s Toy

Montreal skateborders in the mid 60’s. A great short film made by one of Canada’s best directors of the era.

montreal-cycle-chic:

service au guidon

Summer in the city

montreal-cycle-chic:

service au guidon

Summer in the city

"You could spend an hour comparing and contrasting the characters of Joe Buck and Holly Golightly.  Both characters manoeuver through New York nightlife using their sexual wiles."- from The Bowery Boys: New York City History

Fans of movies of the 1960’s can appreciate the similarities between the main characters of two films set in New York City  that were bookmarks for the decade.   “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” (1961) reflects the optimism of the Kennedy era, surrounded by the opulence and glamour associated with high society.  By 1969, “Midnight Cowboy” exposed a city in decline, where urban decay served as a backdrop for the kind of hustler who’s clients could not pretend they had something to hide.  It represented the demythologizing of America exposed by the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement and the deterioration of urban life in general. I have to admit, I’m a bigger fan of the grit.

zombiesenelghetto:

The Velvet Underground: Lou Reed with filmmaker Barbara Rubin photo by Stephen Shore, ca 1964

I was sittin’ too far from the screen and “flank steak” looks like “punk steak”.

zombiesenelghetto:

The Velvet Underground: Lou Reed with filmmaker Barbara Rubin photo by Stephen Shore, ca 1964

I was sittin’ too far from the screen and “flank steak” looks like “punk steak”.

(via sanfrancisco1967)