Aleah Chapin is a young artist from Washington State who has painted a series of portraits of the women from her home town that she refers to as her “aunties”.  She  considers her works to be a representation of the “journey through life”.

Daniel Maidman, reviewing the exhibition for the Huffington Post described her paintings as technically proficient, recognizably NYAA schooled, but marked out by Chapin’s vision as she painted “badass naked older women” whose “age and wounds… tell a story”.- Excerpts from Wikipedia

Photos of Chelsea pubs in the 50’s and 60’s.  I understand few of the independent ones are left, which is probably sad for the UK.

Source:http://rbkclocalstudies.wordpress.com/2014/01/16/bignell-at-the-pub/

Sometime in the summer of 1962, a young kid named George Lucas -who dreamed of racing cars - was broadsided in his Fiat on a Modesto, California road.  He survived and began to reassess his life, deciding to enter college and pursue his other passion, making movies.  It’s another one of those classic “what if?” stories.

 Eisen Bernard Bernardo “mags + art”

It might seem a little lazy, but you have to have an amazing knowledge of art and visual acuity to pull these off. Good argument for the adage that fashion photography took off where portraiture ended.

(via llpopatemyheartll)

sway33:

thecomicsvault:

That Spider-Man show on Disney XD is doing something similar to Marvel’s Spider-Verse event and guess who’s making his TV debut?

So this is a big deal. it marks the first time Miles has showed up in something outside of the Ultimate Comics (excluding video games). Oh, and by the way, Miles is voiced by Donald Glover. You know the guy who had an internet movement who wanted him to be Spider-Man in Sony’s re-boot. There was a group who didn’t want him to be Peter too, but I was in the former camp. This show in the past has been something I’ve avoided, but It’s hard for me to ignore a Spider-Man show with a Miles Morales cameo, especially when he’s voiced by Childish Gambino.

Okay, Sony. If your Sinister Six film performs the same or worse than ASM2, You’ve got no excuse not to greenlight an Ultimate Spider-Man film.

What do you guys think? Are you excited to see Miles? Will you watch the show if you haven’t been right along? Am I getting excited over something that’s not as big a deal as I think it is?

"Oh, and by the way, Miles is voiced by Donald Glover."

Awesome touch. I really do think Glover would be a pretty good fit for a Spiderman movie.

Oliver Reed in a 1965 interview for “The Trap”, where he played a French Canadian fur trapper.  He explains how he learned to speak with a local accent by hanging around the docks and bars of Montreal.  The known boozer and brawler must have had a hell of a time and I’m sure someday I’ll meet someone in their 60’s or 70’s who fought him in a tavern covered in blood, sweat, and broken beer bottles.

"I’ve had one or two close shaves; I don’t think Canadians are used to my beard and long hair….."

Downton Abbey between takes…..

Downton Abbey between takes…..

I loved this opening to “The Triplets of Belleville” because they didn’t miss a key detail about music legend Django Reinhardt.   The revolutionary guitarist had the use of only two fingers and a thumb on his fret hand, making his accomplishments all the more impressive:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptbJPlofeEk

I loved this opening to “The Triplets of Belleville” because they didn’t miss a key detail about music legend Django Reinhardt.   The revolutionary guitarist had the use of only two fingers and a thumb on his fret hand, making his accomplishments all the more impressive:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptbJPlofeEk

(via greektexan)

“Hi Paul, 
 I am writing as a thank you for your patience and advice during my medical school application process. In late May, I got an acceptance to Georgetown University School of Medicine for the class of 2018. I waited to send this email so I could attach a photo from my white coat ceremony that took place just a few weeks ago (as proof that I was actually accepted…). I think it takes an army to get into medical school these days and I consider myself very fortunate for having you on my side during this two year struggle. Without doing the SMP at Georgetown, I would probably still be applying to medical school and more importantly, without talking to you, I would have never known about the SMP! In addition, the ‘Ecological Determinants of Health’ major that you advised me to transfer into has entirely shaped how I think about medicine. I hope you realize that those little bits of advice that you give to undergraduates make a HUGE difference. Thank you again for your advice during this process (if you can even remember how far back that started).”
I’m posting this not to brag, but to give you an idea of what I do. You won’t make a lot of money in academic advising and there’s no chance at fame, but feeling that you’re trying to make a difference in people’s lives is inherently rewarding, especially with a new population of young adults who will shape the world for the next fifty years.  Older people who smugly dismiss the current generation have poor memories of their own mistakes and no understanding of the current world of high expectations and diminished opportunities.

Hi Paul, 

I am writing as a thank you for your patience and advice during my medical school application process. In late May, I got an acceptance to Georgetown University School of Medicine for the class of 2018. I waited to send this email so I could attach a photo from my white coat ceremony that took place just a few weeks ago (as proof that I was actually accepted…).

I think it takes an army to get into medical school these days and I consider myself very fortunate for having you on my side during this two year struggle. Without doing the SMP at Georgetown, I would probably still be applying to medical school and more importantly, without talking to you, I would have never known about the SMP! In addition, the ‘Ecological Determinants of Health’ major that you advised me to transfer into has entirely shaped how I think about medicine. I hope you realize that those little bits of advice that you give to undergraduates make a HUGE difference.

Thank you again for your advice during this process (if you can even remember how far back that started).”

I’m posting this not to brag, but to give you an idea of what I do. You won’t make a lot of money in academic advising and there’s no chance at fame, but feeling that you’re trying to make a difference in people’s lives is inherently rewarding, especially with a new population of young adults who will shape the world for the next fifty years.  Older people who smugly dismiss the current generation have poor memories of their own mistakes and no understanding of the current world of high expectations and diminished opportunities.

MADRID – The first punk guitar that Marky Ramone remembers hearing was in 1964, exactly 10 years before the founding of the Ramones, with “You Really Got Me” by the Kinks, which became a fundamental, foundational number of the hard rock movement following its launch half a century ago.

Inspired by the Kingsmen’s “Louis Louis,” the Davies brothers – Ray and Dave – were facing the third and last chance their record label was giving them to make a hit record, after their fruitless attempts with the Little Richard number “Long Tall Sally” and with “You Still Want Me.”

Not long before that they had scrapped their previous stage name, the Ravens, and out all the tension they were feeling at that time came a song much noisier than the others, inspired by a meeting Ray Davies had with a fan and which made No. 1 on the charts in Britain and was among the Top 10 in the United States, where it was released on Aug. 26, 1964, as part of the “British invasion.”

The number was “You Really Got Me,” well-known for its powerful guitar chords, the use of distortion in the amplifier, and for a furious way of vocalizing the lyrics, which has made it seen as opening the door to heavy metal and hard rock.

The Kinks’ first big hit was accepted into the Grammy Hall of Fame 25 years ago, and is considered the fourth best guitar number in history by Rolling Stone magazine. But it was actually composed on piano with the idea of giving it a much jazzier sound based on a saxophone instrumental – which ended up being taken over by the lead guitar.- Latin American Herald Tribune

For the record, Dave Davies did play the solo on the record, not Jimmy Page.  Somehow his virtuosity as a guitarist has been overlooked in the annals of music history.